October 2019 Agenda—Phoenix, Arizona

Facilitating Technology Enriched Classrooms for 21st Century Learners.

Begin at 9:00am

Getting Connected

Digitally…Socially…Spiritually

Devotion

What are some things that you are thankful for?

Put them on this Thankful Turkey.

Here is a “clean” copy of thankful turkey to use in your classrooms. Make a copy of it so you can edit it.

From the teacher’s perspective…
  • Colossians 3:17 – And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.
  • 1 Chronicles 16:34 – Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good; His love endures forever.
  • 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 – Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus

Announcements

1. The next workshop date is scheduled for Thursday, November 14 at Christ, Phoenix…unless Baby Hollendoner decides to show up early.

2. Upcoming Professional Development Opportunities

Review

Let’s take some time to reflect on last month’s TEC21 Challenges and share experiences. Share a success, a challenge you experienced or a lesson learned.

Goals

1. Discover the value of digital storytelling.

2. Explore digital storytelling tools and resources to use with your students.

3. Identify a tool or resource to share with a colleague.

Digital Storytelling

Everyone has a story to tell! What’s yours?

Made with Padlet
Storytelling
How to Integrate Digital Storytelling

Digital Storytelling can be integrated in any number of ways:

  • Create a virtual tour of a country or historical place.
  • Create a public service announcement on an important local or world issue.
  • Simulate an interview of a historical character.
  • Simulate a debate on an historical topic, such as the Bill of Rights.
  • Create a presentation based on images of local artifacts and architecture.
Media Resources

Rich media is the key to a good digital story. The resources below will help students find what they need.

  • Wikimedia Commons – a wiki database of Creative Commons or Public Domain images.
  • Flickr – a photo and video sharing site where most works are licensed under Creative Commons. The Advanced Search allows students to search only for Creative Commons licensed media.
  • FlickrStorm – another way to search through Flickr that provides even more results. There is an option to search for only images that have been licensed for reuse.
  • Jamendo – a music sharing site of all legal to use songs.
  • Google Advanced Image Search – setting the usage rights shows images that are labeled with a Creative Commons license
  • Library of Congress – an online catalog of thousands of prints and photos currently archived at the LOC. Most of the resources can be published without having to seek permission, and they provide terrific digital artifacts for historical stories.
  • National Archives – billions of images, videos, and digital documents can be found and integrated into projects.
Literary Basis

“Digital storytelling has emerged as a fundamental, cross-curricular technique that provides structure for both sharing and understanding new information. It has become an essential way of providing information and enhancing education…by making abstract or conceptual content more understandable. In all disciplines, it offers more ways to engage students and enrich learning through the inclusion of digital media that represents, illustrates, and demonstrates. Digital storytelling brings together text, graphics, audio, and video around a chosen theme, often with a specific point of view. Bernard Robin observes that a digital story may be a personal tale, a depiction of a historical event, or simply a way to creatively impart information or provide instruction. In the classroom, they can also foster collaboration when students are able to work in groups, and enhance the student experience through a personal sense of accomplishment (Robin, 2006). The National Council of Teachers of English in 2003, challenged teachers to develop instructional strategies for students to master composing in nonprint media that could include any combination of visual art, motion (video and film), graphics, text, and sound—all of which are frequently written and read in nonlinear fashion (Porter, 2008, p. 11). Included was the process of digital storytelling, where information is conveyed in a way that is more engaging than plain text.”

Common Core writing standards require writing and publishing using digital tools beginning already in Kindergarten and continuing through Grade 12.

With guidance and support from adults, explore and use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.6
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.6
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
Apps and Tool Guide

Resources for Digital Storytelling – Sorted by device and level of ease

Stop Motion Video

Stop motion can be time consuming, but a great option for students to express their creativity.  Using LEGOs is one of the most popular ways to create a stop motion video.

Tools to try:

California Gold Rush

Paper Slide Video

Paper slides require a script and illustrations ready to go. They are usually one take videos and go as fast or slow as you would like.

Digital Citizenship Integration

What aspects of digital citizenship need to be addressed when creating digital storytelling projects?

  • Internet Safety
    • Planet Nutshell – safety videos for students (K-3)
      Safe, Smart & Social – An app guide for parents and teachers for students in grades 7-12 (or younger)
    • AT&T Safetyland – 8 question game geared towards younger students (grades 2-4).
    • Axis Culture Translator – Ever feel like teenagers are speaking a foreign language to you? Or that they are so tech savvy that you have a hard time catching up?  Sign up for the Culture Translator by Axis, a free weekly newsletter to help you navigate trending topics in teen culture.
  • Privacy & Security
  • Relationships & Communication
  • Cyberbullying
  • Digital Footprint & Reputation
  • Self-image & Identity
  • Information Literacy
  • Creative Credit & Copyright

Genius Hour

Genius Hour Unit 2: Make a plan

To begin, develop your idea into a project goal. Next, list the first three steps that you will take to make that goal a reality. Then, make a list of resources that you will need including the tech tools that you may integrate into the project.

Lunch Hour at 11:30am/Back to Work at 12:30pm

Digital Tools & Resources

Adobe Spark Video and Page allow students to use format templates to create stories with impactful graphics and animated videos in minutes. Record your voice, add pictures or provided graphics, and turn into a video. Check out my example! Up on the lake…

Book Creator can be used as an app (Book Creator One is free, Book Creator has a $4.99 price tag), but was recently released as a Chrome app so it has the capability to work across all devices.  The Chrome version is free for teachers with 1 library and can hold up to 40 books.  There are two other tiered levels of pricing as well if you need more storage.

Ways to use it in the classroom:

  • Write your own story to teach a lesson about animals or another non-fiction topic.
  • Retell a Bible story.
  • Students could use this at home to create a story on their President, state, etc.
  • Have younger students create a book about themselves to share with the class.
  • Create a memory book to share with parents at the end of the year with your students’ pictures in it.
  • Create a comic book to show the order of events for a historical event.
  • Create a collaborative book where each student creates one page of the book that the teacher can compile together.

Vocaroo lets you easily record audio only.  Once recorded, you have an option to download your sound byte as a link or QR code.  This could be great to have students create a story, read their story aloud while recording, then send parents the link to listen along.  This could also work for original poetry on a parent night.

Your words plus Storybird’s amazing art help you build picture or chapter books in minutes. This site suggests that you select a set of pictures by a featured artist, select the pictures you want to use, drag and drop, arrange them in order, then use the details in the pictures to inspire you write great stories! Write poetry here too!

Web-based, type in what you want an avatar to say.  Perfect for story retelling or to hear another character’s side of the story. Voki example of Jesus and Voki example of President Trump. You can make 3 for free, then need to delete or edit to create more.

Storyjumper.com is the number 1 rated website for making digital stories. Best feature is the site can automatically translate the book into 38 different languages to share with students, parents, and relatives who don’t speak English. Use your own pictures or graphics provided. Create narratives or informational reports with this versatile tool StoryJumper example 

Students can “build” their own jack-o-lantern with this fun and educational Google Slides activity. This is a great way for students to be creative and to work on their writing skills by describing or writing about their Jack-O-Lantern.

Flippity is a website that gives you a demo/instructions/template for turning a Google spreadsheet into a number of classroom tools such as memory game, flash cards, mad libs, bingo, badge tracker and more!  After you have explored the options, open a Google sheet, then get the “add-on” for Flippity.  That way you can access the templates any time you open up a Google sheet.

Draw and Tell is an award-winning creative tool for children of all ages that encourages imagination, story telling and open-ended play. Use the tool to draw, color, decorate with stickers, create animations and record stories. AGES: 3-9.

Anyone who grew up reading Highlights magazine in the dentist waiting room will quickly recognize a rebus. Basically it is a story where some of the words are replaced by images. This can be a fun activity for students, both to create and to read. It may even help with younger students who are not proficient at spelling but can choose the image for the word they want.

Storyboard That  provides a variety of engaging backgrounds, characters, and items help students build a story. The storyboard itself can tell the story, or use it to create another digital story format. Check out the historical settings and consider using for Thanksgiving! You can create several for free.

Worried about students finding their own resources online? Concerned that your students will take too long to select “the perfect picture”? Want them to focus on the storytelling and not the image searching?  Digital Kits are the answer.

Puppet Pals for IOS. Create your own unique shows with animation and audio in real time!

Project Development

TEC21 Challenges

1. Engage your students in a digital storytelling activity or project. Share your experience by posting for others to see!

2. Post a question, an answer, a resource, a picture of your students working on digital storytelling, or an example of student project to the TEC21 Educators Group on Facebook.

3. Be a resource to at least one new person on your faculty before we meet again.

Reflection

Dismiss at 2:00pm

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Connected teachers inspiring students in Technology Enriched Classrooms.

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